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MADURAI IS NATIVE CITY FOR US . IT IS ALSO NAMED AS TEMPLE CITY AND MADURAI IS WELL KNOWN FOR IT'S DELICIOUS FOOD TASTE . WHEN PEOPLE VISIT MADURAI FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD THEIR FIRST PRIORITY IS TO WORSHIP MADURAI ANNAI MEENAKSHI AMMAN & MADURAI PANDI MUNEESWARAR TEMPLE AND THE NEXT COMES TO TASTE MADURAI DELICIOUS FOOD. AS A RESULT WE HAVE STARTED "MADURAI VAALAI VIRUNDHU " WHICH GIVES THE EXACT TASTE OF MADURAI FOOD .

MADURAI CITY Madurai is one of the major cities in the Indian State of Tamil Nadu. It is the cultural capital of Tamil Nadu and the administrative headquarters of Madurai District, the third largest city in Tamil Nadu and 25th most populated city in India. Located on the banks of River Vaigai, Madurai has been a major settlement for two millennia. Madurai is closely associated with the Tamil language, and the third Tamil Sangam, a major congregation of Tamil scholars said to have been held in the city.

Madurai is one of the many temple towns in the state which is named after the groves, clusters or forests dominated by a particular variety of a tree or shrub and the same variety of tree or shrub sheltering the presiding deity. The region is believed to have been covered with Kadamba forest and hence called Kadambavanam. The city is referred by various names including "Madurai", "Koodal", "Malligai Maanagar", "Naanmadakoodal" and "Thirualavai".

The word Madurai may be derived from Madhura (sweetness) arising out of the divine nectar showered on the city by the Hindu god Siva from his matted hair. Another theory is that Madurai is the derivative of the word Marutham, which refers to the type of landscape of the Sangam age. A town in the neighbouring Dindigul district is called Vada Madurai (North Madurai) and another in Sivagangai district is called Manamadurai.

The different names by which the city has been referred to historically are listed in the 7th-century poem Thiruvilayaadal puraanam written by Paranjothi Munivar. Koodal means an assembly or congregation of scholarly people, referring to the three Tamil Sangams held at Madurai. Naanmadakoodal, meaning the junction of four towers, refers to the four major temples for which Madurai was known for. Tevaram, the 7th- or 8th-century Tamil compositions on Shiva by the three prominent Nayanars (Saivites), namely Appar, Sundarar and Thirugnanasambandar, address the city as Thirualavai. As per Iravatham Mahadevan, a 2nd-century BCE Tamil-Brahmi inscription refers to the city as matiray, an Old Tamil word meaning a "walled city".